the-exercist
the-exercist:

lescicatrices:

the-exercist:

manvmiles:

The best lift doors ever…
Snapped at the Technogym Wellness Valley. A message to employees and visitors to take get more active. Gotta love this.
Plus: Other oddities, amusements and fascinating things I’ve stumbled across being a slightly obsessed runner.




To quote an excellent article by Lesley Kinzel:
“[W]hat’s wrong with positively encouraging people to use the three minutes they’d spend in an elevator to exercise instead? Nothing, on the surface. Unfortunately though, these efforts don’t happen in a vacuum — they happen in context with a lot of other, less positive messages. They happen in the same culture that condemns any perceived laziness and less-than-perfect physical condition as moral failures. And that’s where things get a little more complicated.
“While stairs-encouragement may have some positive effects, it has negative ones too. Culturally, it places a heavy value on the ability to climb stairs in the first place, and marks this as both “normal” and the perferred state of things. It reinforces the idea that disabled bodies (or bodies that just aren’t in good enough shape to run up a few floors) are somehow broken, mismanaged or defective, and together with the plethora of other ableist crap we live with every day, this has a powerful and cumulative impact on their quality of life. In a world that sees good physical condition as a signifier of morality and good character, this is a problem.
“Disabled folks’ ability to get around is essentially being sacrificed in favor of feel-good cosmetic changes that let public institutions pat themselves on the back for being so forward-thinking. Ironic.”
So no thanks - The message here isn’t that employees and visitors should get more active, the message is that they should feel guilty for needing or wanting access to mobility aids. That’s not something that I can get behind or support.

there are plenty of social justice causes on Tumblr that I can support, but this one just makes my blood boil each time I see it.  Is this seriously a thing?  Who’s going to give someone in a wheelchair a hard time about not being able to take the stairs?  Is it impossible for someone disabled to see this and simply think “obviously they are not referring to me?”  This seems like a major case of making a mountain out of a molehill.

Several people have reblogged this post in order to share their stories. If you do not have the time to scroll through the notes, you may want to click here, here, here, here and here for a start.
For some outside reading, in addition to the article linked above, you can also see here, here and here.
There are lots of people who feel that it is their duty to police wheelchairs, disabilities and medical problems of all kinds. Memes have even been made for the purpose of mocking wheelchair users. Not to mention that many people would rather photograph a disabled person and post it online to laugh about than actually help someone in trouble. We live in a culture that outright doesn’t value people with disabilities, and you really think that no one would ever make a person feel bad about their mobility aid?
Remember that this isn’t just about people who use wheelchairs - It is about all disabilities and personal situations that may make the stairs an impossibility. When people are explicitly and repeatedly told that they are lazy and that their medical problems are entirely their own fault (or that the problems don’t even exist!), it’s not surprising that they’ll feel hurt by campaigns that outright deny their needs. If this advertisement “obviously” is not “referring to me,” then where is that distinction made? Where are disabilities being taken into account? Where are the campaigns that remind everyone about how elevators are often necessary and good? 
Why should the health and accessibility of disabled bodies be pushed aside in order to promote the health of able bodies?

the-exercist:

lescicatrices:

the-exercist:

manvmiles:

The best lift doors ever…

Snapped at the Technogym Wellness Valley. A message to employees and visitors to take get more active. Gotta love this.

Plus: Other oddities, amusements and fascinating things I’ve stumbled across being a slightly obsessed runner.

image

image

image

To quote an excellent article by Lesley Kinzel:

[W]hat’s wrong with positively encouraging people to use the three minutes they’d spend in an elevator to exercise instead? Nothing, on the surface. Unfortunately though, these efforts don’t happen in a vacuum — they happen in context with a lot of other, less positive messages. They happen in the same culture that condemns any perceived laziness and less-than-perfect physical condition as moral failures. And that’s where things get a little more complicated.

While stairs-encouragement may have some positive effects, it has negative ones too. Culturally, it places a heavy value on the ability to climb stairs in the first place, and marks this as both “normal” and the perferred state of things. It reinforces the idea that disabled bodies (or bodies that just aren’t in good enough shape to run up a few floors) are somehow broken, mismanaged or defective, and together with the plethora of other ableist crap we live with every day, this has a powerful and cumulative impact on their quality of life. In a world that sees good physical condition as a signifier of morality and good character, this is a problem.

Disabled folks’ ability to get around is essentially being sacrificed in favor of feel-good cosmetic changes that let public institutions pat themselves on the back for being so forward-thinking. Ironic.

So no thanks - The message here isn’t that employees and visitors should get more active, the message is that they should feel guilty for needing or wanting access to mobility aids. That’s not something that I can get behind or support.

there are plenty of social justice causes on Tumblr that I can support, but this one just makes my blood boil each time I see it.  Is this seriously a thing?  Who’s going to give someone in a wheelchair a hard time about not being able to take the stairs?  Is it impossible for someone disabled to see this and simply think “obviously they are not referring to me?”  This seems like a major case of making a mountain out of a molehill.

Several people have reblogged this post in order to share their stories. If you do not have the time to scroll through the notes, you may want to click herehere, here, here and here for a start.

For some outside reading, in addition to the article linked above, you can also see here, here and here.

There are lots of people who feel that it is their duty to police wheelchairs, disabilities and medical problems of all kinds. Memes have even been made for the purpose of mocking wheelchair users. Not to mention that many people would rather photograph a disabled person and post it online to laugh about than actually help someone in trouble. We live in a culture that outright doesn’t value people with disabilities, and you really think that no one would ever make a person feel bad about their mobility aid?

Remember that this isn’t just about people who use wheelchairs - It is about all disabilities and personal situations that may make the stairs an impossibility. When people are explicitly and repeatedly told that they are lazy and that their medical problems are entirely their own fault (or that the problems don’t even exist!), it’s not surprising that they’ll feel hurt by campaigns that outright deny their needs. If this advertisement “obviously” is not “referring to me,” then where is that distinction made? Where are disabilities being taken into account? Where are the campaigns that remind everyone about how elevators are often necessary and good?

Why should the health and accessibility of disabled bodies be pushed aside in order to promote the health of able bodies?

no-more-ramen

Leftover-rice pudding (rather informal recipe)

no-more-ramen:

+ Howevermuch rice you want to turn into pudding

+ milk

+ raisins (not required, but I like ‘em. dried date bits might work nicely, too)

+ cinnamon/clove/other flavor you want to put in it

+ sugar

+ microwave

+ microwavable container (I just use the tupperware that the rice is in)

1. Put your rice in the microwavable container, however much rice you want to make into the rice pudding.

2. Pour the milk over the rice, kinda like your breakfast cereal. The milk should just barely seep around the top layer of rice.

3. Microwave for a few minutes, more for more rice, less for less rice. (I’m sorry this isn’t very specific, it really depends on the microwave and the amount of rice.) The milk will evaporate a little, and seep into the rice. You’re basically re-cooking the rice in the milk.
When your rice comes out of the microwave it WILL BE HOT, so be careful.

4. Mix in raisins/dried fruit and sugar (to taste). Let sit for a little while, so the raisins can absorb some of the milk, and so the rice can, too. A few minutes (<15) should work fine. If you’re preparing dinner, you can go do that and let the rice sit, it’ll be fine.

5. Microwave again, for a minute or two.

6. Add in spices and let sit until you’re too impatient to wait anymore and just eat it.
(Be careful not to eat it when it’s too hot. If you have a refrigerator, sticking it in there for a few minutes’ll help)

The rice pudding won’t be anything fancy, unless you’re more skilled than I am, but it’s edible and a little delicious.

no-more-ramen

Easy Sweet Potato Fries with Spicy Mayo

no-more-ramen:

Ingredients:

  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Oil (canola, olive, coconut, whatever)
  • Salt, Pepper, Spices (Spice ideas - paprika, rosemary, curry powder, steak spice blend)
  • Mayo (can use vegan or regular)
  • Sriracha (other hot sauce will work too)

Preheat your oven to 450.

How to: Peel your sweet potatos and cut them into strips. You don’t need to worry about if they’re bigger wedge shapes, as long as the pieces are relatively thin.  Toss the strips in a bowl with enough oil to coat.  Season with salt, pepper, and spices. Lay on a pan, trying to not have the fries overlapping each other.  Put in the oven for 20-25 minutes.  Flip the fries once, about half-way through.

Dip - Mix together a heaping spoonful of mayo with a generous squeeze of sriracha.  This really varies on how much spice you like.  Mix together. Enjoy!